Submitting papers


Instructions for submitting papers

1. Submitting a document
2. The scientific peer review process
3. Presenting manuscripts
3.1. Sections
3.2. Rules for abstract writing
3.3. Keywords
3.4. Limits for the length of the texts
3.5. Graphics, tables and pictures
3.6. Footnotes and special characters
4. Bibliographical references
4.1. References within the text
4.2. Examples of references according to the APA format

Authors who wish to see their work published at Laboreal should follow a set of rules which are shown below. These are in order to make texts more readable and to simplify the electronic reproduction process.

 

1. SUBMITTING A DOCUMENT

Submitted manuscripts must be original texts, aligned with the journal’s editorial policy and suitable for publication under one of its sections (cf. list of sections). Authors may submit the document either in Portuguese or Spanish, depending on the predefined layout (cf. section 3. “Presenting manuscripts”), through laboreal@fpce.up.pt.

Manuscripts should be sent to Laboreal together with a letter of request, signed by the author(s), explaining the intention to submit or resubmit the text for publication. This letter should include a statement that the submitted text and the referred research comply with the fundamental ethical principles established by the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE; available at publicationethics.org). As a member journal, Laboreal follows COPE’s guidelines.



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2. THE SCIENTIFIC PEER REVIEW PROCESS

All manuscripts submitted by their authors are peer reviewed. Each manuscript goes through the following stages:
 

1. The members of the Editorial Committee read the manuscript and determine the its suitability according to the Journal’s editorial policy.
2. If the manuscript is accepted, the Editorial Committee assigns two experts to appraise the manuscript.
3. The manuscript is sent to the reviewers without the author’s name. This process is a double-blind process, since the reviewers do not know the author’s name and the reviewers, in turn, remain unknown to the author.
4. The reviewers fill out a referee report form and send it back to the Journal’s Editorial Committee within an agreed deadline.
5. Based on the two opinions, the Editorial Committee writes a single report to be sent back to the author. Provided that the reviewers make a recommendation for acceptance, the report includes a set of recommendations that must be implemented prior to the paper being published.
6. The author sends the final version of the paper to the Editorial Committee within the indicated deadline, along with a letter explaining the changes and justifying their options.
7. The Editorial Committee checks whether the experts’ recommendations were followed by the author and may require further changes. Once this process is concluded, it is decided whether the paper can approved for publishing.
8. Upon approval, the author (or each author, in case there is more than one) signs the copyright transfer and a statement of originality (available for download in Portuguese or Spanish). Once the document is filled out and signed, it is sent to Laboreal via email or regular mail. This copy is kept in the Journal’s dossiers.
9.

All dates regarding the peer review process are documented. If the paper is published, submission and acceptance after peer review dates are identified on the first page. Authors can expect to see their article published within no more than 12 months after submitting, as long as they meet the deadlines.

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3. PRESENTING MANUSCRIPTS



3.1. Manuscript’s sections

The papers for each section should be organized as follows:

3.1.1. Empirical research; Research instruments; Archaeology of knowledge; Notable works; Critical and topical reviews:
Texts written in portuguese
Texts written in spanish

 

Headings and their order
1. Section’s name in Portuguese
2. Title in Portuguese
3. Identification of the authors (professional affiliation; address; and e-mail address)
4. Abstract (max. 150 words) and keywords in Spanish (max. 5 words)
5. Body text (number the different parts that comprise the paper)
6. Notes (if applicable -- cf. 3.6)
7. References (APA format -- cf. 4)
8. Title in Spanish. Abstract (max. 150 words) and keywords in Portuguese (max. 5 words)
9. Title, abstract (max. 150 words) and keywords in French (max. 5 words)
10. Title, abstract (max. 150 words) and keywords in English (max. 5 words)


 

Headings and their order
1. Section’s name in Spanish
2. Title in Spanish
3. Author information (professional affiliation, address and e-mail address)
4. Abstract (max. 150 words) and keywords in Portuguese (max. 5 words)
5. Body text (number the different parts that comprise the paper)
6. Notes (if applicable -- cf. 3.6)
7. References (APA format -- cf. 4)
8. Title in Portuguese and abstract (max. 150 words) and keywords in Spanish (max. 5 words)
9. Title, abstract (max. 150 words) and keywords in French (max. 5 words)
10. Title, abstract (max. 150 words) and keywords in English (max. 5 words)



3.1.2. Reply papers; Thesis summary; Critical review of books; The dictionary; Reports on the work experience:
Texts written in either Portuguese or Spanish (except with articles submitted as Thesis Summaries, in which case the text should be presented in both languages):
 

Headings and their order
1. Section’s name in Portuguese and in Spanish
2. Title in Portuguese
3. Author information (professional affiliation, address and e-mail address)
4. Body text (number the different parts that comprise the paper)
5. Notes (if applicable -- cf. 3.6)
6. References (APA format -- cf. 4)
7. Title in Spanish
8. Title in French
9. Title in English


3.1.3. Conference minutes; Could you repeat that?
These documents shall be published as a result of ad hoc protocols.

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3.2. Rules for abstract writing

The abstract must be written in all of the following languages: Portuguese, Spanish, French and English. The author is responsible for the translations, guaranteeing the proper use of each language’s grammar and spelling rules.

There is a limit of 150 words for the abstract. It should be clear and easy to read, going through all the details that help the reader to understand the main contributions of the paper. The abstract must then describe the key elements in an way that is objective and concise – free from superfluous information or tables, pictures or references.

3.2.1. For the section "Empirical research" in particular, it is important that the abstract includes:

  • the aim of the research;
  • a brief description of the research focus;
  • the methodology;
  • the site where the research took place (provided it is a relevant information);
  • outcomes, conclusions or consequences.

3.2.2. For the sections "Reports on the work experience", "Research instruments" and "Notable works", in particular, it is important that the abstract includes:

  • main topic;
  • approach;
  • author’s point of view;
  • outcomes, conclusions or consequences.

3.2.3. For the sections "Archaeology of knowledge" and "Critical and topical review", in particular, it is important that the abstract includes:

  • the scope of the analysis;
  • the period covered by the analysis;
  • the main source for the publications under analysis;
  • type of documents used;
  • author’s opinion, especially when it comes to express the main contribution of the analysis;
  • outcomes, stating which research lines are open to further research.

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3.3. Keywords

The paper must include:

  • 3 to 5 keywords;
  • Keywords in four languages: Portuguese, Spanish, French, and English.

The purpose of the keywords is not to indicate the paper’s particularities, but to direct to its field or domain. Relevant keywords indicate:

  • the study or application domain;
  • the paper’s objectives;
  • the main concepts.

We recommend checking the existing thesauri from international databases for keywords (for instance, APA or Ergonomic Abstracts), in order to increase the chances of a quicker access to the article.

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3.4. Limits for the length of the texts

The length of the documents depends upon the section in which it might be published (including graphics, tables and pictures). The maximum number of characters for each section (spaces included) is:

 

Empirical research

Reports on the work experience

Research instruments

Archaeology of knowledge

Notable works

Critical and topical review

75000 characters

 

Critical review of books

Thesis summary

Reply papers

The dictionary

15000 characters

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3.5. Graphics, tables and pictures

Graphics, tables and pictures must follow the guidelines below:

  • The size must never be larger than the text zone;
  • Each graphic, table or picture must be captioned with an explanation of the main variables;
  • Pictures must be in JPEG format, with a minimum resolution of 200dpi;
  • They will be inserted in the text, but the author must also send them as separate files.

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3.6. Footnotes and special characters

The text should not contain footnotes, but authors may use endnotes, which should be identified throughout the text and appear at the end, immediately before the article’s bibliography. The place where the note should be inserted is marked with square brackets and the number of the note in the text (e.g. [1]). The corresponding text appears toward the end of the text (e.g. [1] International Labour Organization).

Special characters – mathematical characters, etc. – should be inserted in the text in the form of symbols.

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4. BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES

Laboreal follows the APA format, which is available at apastyle.org.

 

4.1. References within the text

Reference notes inserted within the text should respect the author(s)–date format (the author’s last name followed by the date in which the document was published).

Examples:
 

  • One author: (Kergoat, 1993)
  • Two authors: (Teiger & Lacomblez, 2013)
  • Three, four or five authors: the first time they are quoted all the names are referred - (Pikaar, Koningsveld & Settels, 2007). Subsequent quotes refer the name of the first author followed by “et al.” - (Pikaar et al., 2007)
  • Six or more authors: all the quotes along the text refer solely the name of the first author followed by “et al.”
  • Institutions as authors: the name of the institutions appears unabbreviated the first time. If they are easily recognized, initials may be used on subsequent references (APA, 2010). The name should be repeated in full if it is not immediately recognized - (Autoridade para as Condições de Trabalho, 2011).
  • Republications: both the publication and the republication dates should be mentioned - (Wisner, 1984/2012).

When the authors are included in the body the word “and” should be added with the date in parentheses:

  • “The work developed by Teiger and Laville (1991) made it clear…”

Whenever the author refers to multiple works from the same author, the dates should be indicated in chronological order. If the same author published more than one work in the same year, letters should be used along with each year for a clearer distinction:

  • (Teixeira, 2000, 2004a, 2004b, 2011).

A short, direct quotation (up to 40 words) should be identified with quotation marks (“…”) and mention the its author, date and page number. Provided the transcription is translated, the expression “free translation” should be added after the page number. Furthermore, the quotation should be inserted in the text using exactly the same font.

Example

  • In fact, the relationships between health and work are covered in a huge complexity, “they are neither unambiguous nor instantaneous” (Gollac & Volkoff, 2000, p. 23, free translation).

When the transcription is longer (over 40 words) a block quotation should be used – detached from the text and without quotation marks (referring the author, date, and page number where the excerpt can be found). If the extract is translated, the expression “free translation” should be added after the page number. The quotation’s font-size should also be smaller than the body.

Example
Consequently, the focus on human action is shared and reinforced over again due to the health concept and experience,

(…) for man, to live means also to learn. I feel good, because I feel myself capable of taking responsibilities for my actions, of making things happen and of creating new connections among things that were not possible without me, but that wouldn’t be the same without them. This is why I feel the need to learn what they are so that I can change them (Canguilhem, 2002, p. 68, free translation).

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4.2. Examples of references according to the APA format

The references are organized alphabetically and chronologically at the end of the paper.

These are some of the most common examples:

Same author, different publication years:
Reason, J. (2009). El error humano. Madrid: Editorial modus laborandi.
Reason, J. (2010).La contribución humana. Actos peligrosos y acciones ejemplares. Madrid: Editorial modus laborandi.

Single author or joint authorship:
Montulet, B. (2005). Au-delà de la mobilité : des formes de mobilité. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie, 118, 137-159. doi : 10.3917/cis.118.0137
Montulet, B., & Kaufmann, V. (Eds.) (2004). Mobilités, fluidités, liberté?Bruxelles: Publications des Facultés Universitaires Saint-Louis.

Book:
Author, (Year in brackets). Title of the book in italic (edition number). City of publisher: Publisher.

Examples
Figueiredo, M., Athayde, M., Brito, J., & Alvarez, D. (Orgs.) (2004). Labirintos do trabalho: interrogações e olhares sobre o trabalho vivo. Rio de Janeiro: DP&A Editora.

R. (2013). Construir la seguridad. Compromisos individuales y colectivos para afrontar los grandes riesgos. Madrid: Editorial modus laborandi.

Book chapter:
Chapter’s author, (Year in brackets). Title of the book’s chapter. In Book authors (Mention whether the authors play the role of book editors – Eds. - or Organizers – Orgs. – or Directors – Dirs.), Book title in italic (chapter pages in the book). City of publisher: Publisher.

Example
Nusshold, P., Poy, M., & Keegan, E. (2011). As atividades de serviço e o setor bancário argentino: uma intervenção durante a crise do setor em 2002. In L. Sznelwar (Ed.), Saúde dos bancários(pp. 169-176). São Paulo: L. Publisher.

Journal article:
Author, (Year in brackets). Paper’s title. Journal’s title in italic. Volume (in italic), Number(s) (in italic), Paper’s pagination.

Example
Parker, D., & Lawton, R. (1998). Organizational controls and safety: The varieties of rule-related behavior. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology,  71, 4,289-304.

PhD or Master's Thesis:
Author, (Year in brackets). Title of the thesis in italic. Name of the academic qualification, Educational Institution, City.

Example
Santos, M. (2004). O projecto de uma sociedade do conhecimento: de Lev Vygotski a práticas efectivas de formação contínua em Portugal.Tesede Doutoramento, Faculdade de Psicologia e Ciências da Educação da Universidade do Porto, Porto.

Report:
Author, (Year in brackets). Title of the report in italic. References of the report, City: Institution.

Example
Castelhano, J., & Nogueira, S. (2011). Género e trabalho: o processo de inserção feminina em profissões tradicionalmente masculinas. Relatório final do projeto PIHM/GC/0079/2008. Porto: FPCE-UP.

Presentation:
Author, (Year, month in brackets). Title of the presentation in italic. Conference name. City, Country, Month.

Example
Clot, Y. (1999, novembro). Souffrance au travail, amputation du pouvoir d’agir, défenses et ripostes. Comunicação apresentada no Colóquio de Namur. Namur, France.

When the presentation is published in periodic minutes, it should follow the layout determined for journal articles.

Example
Örtengren, R. (1991). Simulation as a tool for ergonomic evaluation of work tasks in production planning. In Y. Queinnec, & F. Daniellou (Eds.), Designing for every-one. Proceedings of the 11th International Ergonomics Association (IEA) Congress, vol. 2, 1078-1080, France.

Online documents:
Author, (Year in brackets). Title of the document in italic (Media type). Date retrieved, website.

Example
Juárez, H. (2002). Las maquiladoras del vestido en México. Trabajadores en Línea.Retiradomarço, 15,  2007 de: http://www.uom.mx

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